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Major General James K. Gilman New Commander of Medical Research and Materiel Command at Fort Detrick

by U.S. Medicine

July 26, 2009

WASHINGTON—Major General James K. Gilman became the new commander of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command at Fort Detrick last month. The U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command is the Army’s medical materiel developer, with lead agency responsibility for medical research, development and acquisition, medical logistics management, medical information management/information technology, and medical health facility planning.

Dr. Gilman was previously the commander of Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas, and Great Plains Regional Medical Command, which overseas Army hospitals and clinics in 16 states.

He is a 1974 graduate of Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology where he earned a degree in Biological Engineering. He received his MD from Indiana University School of Medicine in 1978. He is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Diseases and is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology.

Dr Gilman is a graduate of Command and General Staff College and the Army War College. His military awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit (3 OLC), Meritorious Service Medal (2 OLC), the Army Staff Badge, and the Expert Field Medical Badge. He also is the recipient of The Surgeon General’s “A” Proficiency Designator and a member of the Order of Military Medical Merit.


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