2010 Issues   /   February 2010

Smoking Rates Among US Adults Remain Stalled in 2008

USM By U.S. Medicine
February 14, 2010

WASHINGTON, DC—Smoking rates among US adults remained stalled in 2008, halting the nation’s progress toward ending the tobacco epidemic, according to the CDC. A CDC study found that 46 million Americans (20.6 percent) were current cigarette smokers in 2008, which is virtually unchanged since 2004, when 20.9 percent of adults reported being smokers.

This new data, based on the 2008 National Health Interview Survey, shows little to no change over the past 5 years, worrying officials that smoking rates may be moving in the wrong direction. “Today tobacco will kill more than 1,000 people, but we can reduce smoking rates,” said CDC Director Thomas R. Frieden, MD, MPH, in a statement. “We must protect people from second-hand smoke, increase the price of tobacco, and support aggressive anti-tobacco campaigns that will reduce smoking and save lives. If every state had smoking rates similar to places that have implemented effective programs, there would be at least 10 million fewer smokers in the US, and millions of heart attacks, cancers, strokes, and deaths would be prevented.”

According to the study, people with lower levels of education smoked at greater levels than those with a graduate degree. In 2008, 41.3 percent of persons with a General Education Development certificate smoked cigarettes, compared to 5.7 percent of persons with a graduate degree.

In another study in the Nov 13 issue of CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System reports that current adult smoking prevalence varied substantially across 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the three US territories. Among states, the percent of smoking prevalence was highest in West Virginia (26.6), Indiana (26.1), and Kentucky (25.3), and lowest in Utah (9.2), California (14), and New Jersey (14.8).

back to February articles


Related Articles

Massive Effort Launched to Aid Haitian Earthquake Victims

WASHINGTON, DC—As part of the overall US relief effort for Haiti, the US military began a massive effort last month to provide assistance in the wake of a deadly earthquake that killed thousands of people... View Article

2010 DoD-VA Suicide Prevention Conference

WASHINGTON, DC—The Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury and VA held a conference last month examining suicide and suicide prevention. “For all of our sophisticated knowledge, we still do not... View Article


U.S. Medicine Recommends


More From february 2010

February 2010

Massive Effort Launched to Aid Haitian Earthquake Victims

SYRACUSE, NY — Despite limited evidence to support the practice, testing for Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is recommended for work-up of unexplained iron deficiency anemia (IDA). A study published in the journal Gastroenterology Report sought... View Article

February 2010

2010 DoD-VA Suicide Prevention Conference

SYRACUSE, NY — Despite limited evidence to support the practice, testing for Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is recommended for work-up of unexplained iron deficiency anemia (IDA). A study published in the journal Gastroenterology Report sought... View Article

February 2010

Veterans Service Organizations Invited to Discuss Legislative Priorities

SYRACUSE, NY — Despite limited evidence to support the practice, testing for Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is recommended for work-up of unexplained iron deficiency anemia (IDA). A study published in the journal Gastroenterology Report sought... View Article

February 2010

Webinar Provides Training for Healthcare Responders

SYRACUSE, NY — Despite limited evidence to support the practice, testing for Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is recommended for work-up of unexplained iron deficiency anemia (IDA). A study published in the journal Gastroenterology Report sought... View Article

February 2010

DoD-VA Suicide Prevention Conference: Compassion Fatigue Can Plague Healthcare Providers

SYRACUSE, NY — Despite limited evidence to support the practice, testing for Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is recommended for work-up of unexplained iron deficiency anemia (IDA). A study published in the journal Gastroenterology Report sought... View Article

Facebook Comment

Subscribe to U.S. Medicine Print Magazine

U.S. Medicine is mailed free each month to physicians, pharmacists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and administrators working for Veterans Affairs, Department of Defense and U.S. Public Health Service.

Subscribe Now

Receive Our Email Newsletter

Stay informed about federal medical news, clinical updates and reports on government topics for the federal healthcare professional.

Sign Up