RelayHealth wins Blue Button Contest

by U.S. Medicine

November 10, 2011

WASHINGTON – And the winner is…..

VA announced that RelayHealth, McKesson’s connectivity business is the winner of the “Blue Button for All Americans” contest.

In the content, sponsored by VA’s Innovations Initiative (VAi2), RelayHealth won the $50,000 contest prize by making a Blue Button personal health record (PHR) system available to all patients, including veterans, of more than 25,000 physicians across the country.

 “We held this contest to help veterans across America to be able to download their health data regardless of where they get their care,” said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki. “We wanted to give veterans and their families easy access to their health data with the Blue Button so they can have greater control over the health care they receive. RelayHealth’s contribution to this goal is more than commendable.”

RelayHealth has announced that it will donate the prize to the Wounded Warrior Project, which supports programs that assist injured servicemembers, veterans and their families.

“RelayHealth has always offered one-click download of the continuity of care document (CCD) and is proud to support the Blue Button initiative,” said Jim Bodenbender, president, RelayHealth Connectivity Solutions. “By allowing patients – including veterans and active-duty service members – to easily access their healthcare information, the initiative will increase patients’ ability to actively engage in managing their own health care.” Bodenbender continued, “We’re honored to donate the prize to the Wounded Warrior Project.”

Blue Button personal health records (PHR) allow patients to see, download and keep their health data by clicking the “Blue Button” on a secure Internet site. The information also can be shared with physicians to improve health care decisionmaking.

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