To the Editor-in-Chief:

by U.S. Medicine

April 10, 2017

I would like to first commend you on your clear and thought provoking editorials in U.S. Medicine. I truly enjoy reading them and have learned a lot from your comments. I especially want to thank you for your incredibly well written editorial, “A living dog is better than a dead lion.” in US Medicine 53(2): 7 (Feb 2017). I don’t think I have heard a politician or health care advocate, to date, express so pristinely, as you have, the importance of pause and reflection in this critical debate.  It is unfortunate that our politicians bend to such superficial and mundane whims and cast debates in completely arbitrary dichotomous terms.

In a similar vein, I also wish that the public could see some of the positive articles about VA healthcare published in U.S. Medicine like the current article on decreasing MRSA rates and a prior article highlighting (again) the superiority of VA care on key healthcare measures as compared to the private sector.

One could almost argue your editorial on Obamacare could be extended to the VA Healthcare system as well; especially in light of some caustic statements by our current president regarding the potential for privatizing VA health care. I hope and believe that our current secretary has better sense. I am, however, a bit worried about talks about going to a private EMR over VISTA/CPRS (which I absolutely love and would never want to see replaced).

Thank you again and I look forward to reading your next editorial.

Roy O. Mathew, MD, FASN
Associate professor of clinical Internal medicine
University of South Carolina School of Medicine
Columbia, SC
Nephrologist
WJB Dorn VA Medical Center
Columbia, SC 29209


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