Clinical Topics   /   This Year in Federal Medicine - Outlook 2013

Army Medicine: Redefining Its Role in the Generation of a Ready and Resilient Force

USM By U.S. Medicine
February 9, 2013

By Lt. Gen. Patricia D. Horoho, RN, Surgeon General, U.S. Army

Lt. Gen. Patricia Horoho,
MSN, RN

Promoting health for more than 9.7 million beneficiaries in the Military Health System (MHS) is a shared responsibility among the military services, purchased-care providers and beneficiaries that requires team collaboration to successfully achieve medically ready forces, healthy beneficiaries and a high-quality, cost-effective system for health.

The Army Medical Department (AMEDD) is a key component in that shared responsibility. Army Medicine has developed and continues to develop initiatives to meet the changing needs of soldiers and their families during the past decade at war. We must continue to maintain the adaptability and flexibility to meet future Army requirements.

U.S. Army soldiers from 2nd Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade 1st Cavalry Division, practice loading patients into a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter during medical evacuation training at Contingency Operation Site Warrior, Kirkuk province.

During the past 11 years, Army Medicine has focused on supporting an Army at war in two simultaneous theaters of conflict. It has improved training, modified processes, eliminated non-essential missions and made significant contributions to global healthcare, medical research and training. But now, with the end of those conflicts in sight, Army Medicine must look forward and chart a new course that will support the strategic reset of the Army, increase soldier readiness, improve the health of all of its beneficiaries and ensure that medical diplomacy is a strategic Army asset. In the face of certain budget constraints, this transformation is critical to ensure Army Medicine continues to set the example for the Army, DoD and the nation in quality healthcare, wellness, prevention and collective health.

My expressed vision for Army Medicine continues our mission to care for soldiers, families and retirees but broadens that mission to engage all patients in multiple ways to influence health outside of clinic visits. Guiding and encouraging patients to make healthier choices when not under our care will increase the Army’s medical readiness and improve patient health outcomes.


Related Articles

High Rate of Pectoralis Tears Among Deployed Servicemembers Lifting Weights

Lifting weights is one way servicemembers keep in peak physical condition during deployment.

DoD Study Finds That Type 2 Diabetes Increases Breast Cancer Mortality

Having Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2) increases mortality risk in breast cancer patients, regardless of whether diabetes was diagnosed before or after breast cancer, according to a recent study.


U.S. Medicine Recommends


More From department of defense dod

Department of Defense (DoD)

High Rate of Pectoralis Tears Among Deployed Servicemembers Lifting Weights

Lifting weights is one way servicemembers keep in peak physical condition during deployment.

Department of Defense (DoD)

DoD Study Finds That Type 2 Diabetes Increases Breast Cancer Mortality

Having Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2) increases mortality risk in breast cancer patients, regardless of whether diabetes was diagnosed before or after breast cancer, according to a recent study.

Department of Defense (DoD)

Now Hear This: Otolaryngologist Leads Effort to Prevent Auditory Issues

Among those who are exposed to combat, it’s the weapons fire that does it. In the Navy, it’s the noise levels in engine rooms and on the decks of carriers.

Department of Defense (DoD)

GAO: ‘Gaps’ in MHS Physician Specialties Could Affect Wartime Readiness

WASHINGTON — The military services need to develop “targeted and coordinated strategies” to alleviate military physician gaps, a recent report recommended.

Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

VA Vows to Meet Deadline for Revamp of Veteran Claims Appeal Process

WASHINGTON—VA has told legislators that the agency is on track with a new law that will give veterans more options to have their claims appeals reviewed.

Facebook Comment

Subscribe to U.S. Medicine Print Magazine

U.S. Medicine is mailed free each month to physicians, pharmacists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and administrators working for Veterans Affairs, Department of Defense and U.S. Public Health Service.

Subscribe Now

Receive Our Email Newsletter

Stay informed about federal medical news, clinical updates and reports on government topics for the federal healthcare professional.

Sign Up