Department of Defense (DoD)   /   This Year in Federal Medicine - Outlook 2012

Navy Medicine Moves Forward In 2012

By U.S. Medicine

Vice Adm. Matthew L. NathanVice Adm. Matthew L. Nathan, U.S. Navy Surgeon General

I am pleased to report that the state of Navy Medicine is strong. I am proud and humbled to be at the helm of this 63,000-person organization and though numerous challenges abound this year, I sleep better at night given the leadership team I recently inherited and where I know we are going to go together.

I wanted to provide a brief snapshot of where we are with regards to numbers.

Navy Medicine By the Numbers:

Medical Corps

Active Duty: 3,800 (of which 1,026 are in
formalized specialty/subspecialty training)

Reservists: 580

Nurse Corps

Nurses:             4,073

Active Duty:      2,911

Reservists         1,162

Dental Corps

Dentists:           1,275

Active Duty:      1,015

Reservists           260  

Medical Service Corps

Active Duty:       2,526

Reservists           349

Hospital Corps

Active Duty:      25,481

Reserve Full-Time Support: 638

Manning:           97%

Nearly 700 hospital corpsmen are supporting Health Service Augmentation Program (HSAP) and Individual Augmentee (IA) missions, close to 6,500 supporting Fleet Marine Force, and more than 5,000 in serving on ships, submarines, SEABEES and other sea-duty platforms. At any given time, approximately 2,700 are in training.

Navy Medicine personnel are serving all across the globe in various missions, and often it seems many people don’t recognize the very real and direct impact our people have in the ongoing conflicts abroad, and even fewer recognize the sacrifices of the brave men and women of Navy Medicine. More than half of Navy personnel wounded in action and nearly one-third of those killed in action during these conflicts have been Navy Medicine, whether corpsmen or other medical personnel. These are staggering numbers and ones that I want to highlight and honor, as these sailors represent the very best of what we do — service and sacrifice. 


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