<--GAT-->

New Law Creates National Plan to Combat Alzheimer’s

by U.S. Medicine

February 22, 2011

USM_02-11_Collins-alz.jpgWASHINGTON,DC—For the first time since federal research agencies began conducting research on Alzheimer’s disease (AD), there is a national plan designed to focus those efforts. Last month, President Obama signed into law a bill creating a National Alzheimer’s Project within HHS to “accelerate the development of treatments that would prevent, halt, or reverse the course of Alzheimer’s.”

The project will help coordinate the healthcare and treatment of people with Alzheimer’s; ensure the inclusion of ethnic and racial populations that are at high risk for Alzheimer’s in clinical, research, and service efforts; coordinate with international bodies in global AD efforts; and also provide information and coordination of AD research and services across all federal agencies.

The law directs HHS to create an Office of the National Alzheimer’s Project, as well as an Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research and Treatment. The office will have the authority to evaluate all federal programs concerning AD.

The Senate unanimously passed the bill shortly before winter break. Sen Susan Collins (R-ME), one of the sponsors of the bill, said, “If nothing is done to change the current trajectory of the disease, 13.5 million Americans over the age of 65 will have Alzheimer’s disease by 2050.  Moreover, if nothing is done to slow or stop the disease, Alzheimer’s will cost the United States $20 trillion over the next 40 years.  Despite these alarming projections, to date there is no national strategy to defeat Alzheimer’s.  The National Alzheimer’s Project Act will create a coordinated strategic national plan to focus our efforts and ensure that our resources are maximized and leveraged to find better treatments, a means of prevention, and ultimately a cure for Alzheimer’s disease.”

back to February articles


Comments are closed here.


Related Articles

Lack of DoD/VA Decision-Maker Could Hamper EHR Implementation

WASHINGTON—Plans are moving ahead for VA’s 10-year, $16 billion effort to modernize its electronic health record system, but legislators still have questions about the project’s timeline and funding, as well as concerns about the project’s... View Article

Democrats Look at VA Role of Trump’s Mar-a-Lago Associates

WASHINGTON—Congress announced last month that it will be opening an investigation into alleged improper influence by three civilian consultants to President Donald Trump on administration of the VA. The three men—Ike Perlmutter, CEO of Marvel... View Article


U.S. Medicine Recommends


More From department of veterans affairs

Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

VA Announces Proposed Standards for Access to Mission Act Outside Care

WASHINGTON—Congress announced last month that it will be opening an investigation into alleged improper influence by three civilian consultants to President Donald Trump on administration of the VA. The three men—Ike Perlmutter, CEO of Marvel... View Article

Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

VA Announces New Partnerships to Expand Telehealth Services

WASHINGTON—Congress announced last month that it will be opening an investigation into alleged improper influence by three civilian consultants to President Donald Trump on administration of the VA. The three men—Ike Perlmutter, CEO of Marvel... View Article

Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

VA Fails to Use All Outreach Resources to Combat Veteran Suicide

Despite declaring veteran suicide as its No. 1 clinical priority, VA’s suicide prevention outreach efforts dropped off in 2017 and 2018, and a lack of clear goals and inconsistent leadership has impacted its success, according to a Government Accountability Office report.

Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

Disabled Veteran Helps Others Like Her Get Back Into the Workforce

Ten years ago, Coniece Washington was walking through the Washington, DC, VA Medical Center when she saw a job notice tacked to a board: certified rehabilitation counselor.

Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

Senate Blocks Agent Orange Exposure Extension to Blue Water Veterans

Blue Water Navy veterans who claim to be impacted by toxic exposure while serving off the coast of Vietnam were forced to grapple with disappointment once again as the 115th Congress ended without passing legislation addressing their VA benefits.

Subscribe to U.S. Medicine Print Magazine

U.S. Medicine is mailed free each month to physicians, pharmacists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and administrators working for Veterans Affairs, Department of Defense and U.S. Public Health Service.

Subscribe Now

Receive Our Email Newsletter

Stay informed about federal medical news, clinical updates and reports on government topics for the federal healthcare professional.

Sign Up