Non-Clinical Topics   /   News

Perceived Discrimination Linked to Black Veterans’ Heart Issues

USM By U.S. Medicine
July 12, 2012

A new study has found that perceived discrimination was associated with risk of severe coronary obstruction among black male veterans, and the researchers recommend that factor be considered in screening and treating patients at the VA.

The research, conducted at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth and VAMCs in Pittsburgh, Milwaukee and Boston, found that perceived discrimination was “positively related to risk of severe obstruction among blacks, but not among whites, after controlling for clinical and psychosocial variables.” Patients who underwent coronary angiography showed similar results, the authors wrote.

Researchers used data from 793 male veterans with positive nuclear imaging studies — 629 white and 164 black. Based on the nuclear imaging results, patients in the study group were categorized as either low-to-moderate or high risk for severe coronary obstruction. Hierarchical logistic regression models were tested separately for blacks and whites, with the first step of the models including clinical factors, the second step including the psychosocial variables of optimism, religiosity, negative affect and social support, and the final step including perceived discrimination.

In this study of male veterans with abnormal nuclear imaging studies, we found that, among black men, greater perceptions of racial discrimination were related to increased risk for severe coronary obstruction and to angiographic coronary obstruction after controlling for clinical and psychosocial factors that are related to cardiovascular health,” the authors wrote.

Perceived discrimination “could be an important target for future interventions,” they added.

1. Ayotte BJ, Hausmann LR, Whittle J, Kressin NR. The relationship between
perceived discrimination and coronary artery obstruction. Am Heart J. 2012
Apr;163(4):677-83. PubMed PMID: 22520534.


Related Articles

Fibromyalgia Presents Differently in Male, Female Veterans

Research on fibromyalgia, a poorly understood, chronically disabling pain syndrome, generally has focused on its clinical presentation and treatment.

How Veterans Feel About Remote Management of Their Care

The VA is expanding remote management of patients to improve disease prevention and care.


U.S. Medicine Recommends


More From department of veterans affairs

Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

Fibromyalgia Presents Differently in Male, Female Veterans

Research on fibromyalgia, a poorly understood, chronically disabling pain syndrome, generally has focused on its clinical presentation and treatment.

Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

How Veterans Feel About Remote Management of Their Care

The VA is expanding remote management of patients to improve disease prevention and care.

Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

Stick-on Monitors Help Warn of Heart Failure Exacerbation in VA Study

While implantable devices have shown promise in reducing rehospitalization for heart failure (HF), VA researchers sought to determine if options that are less expensive and non-invasive would have comparable results.

Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

Legislation: Clinicians Must Be Involved in Formulary Design, Purchasing

Legislation to prevent VA from outsourcing creation of its drug formulary and to require more input from medical professions is being considered in Congress.

Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

GAO: VA Needs Better Planning for ‘Complex’ Appeals System Overhaul

SYRACUSE, NY — Despite limited evidence to support the practice, testing for Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is recommended for work-up of unexplained iron deficiency anemia (IDA). A study published in the journal Gastroenterology Report sought... View Article

Facebook Comment

Subscribe to U.S. Medicine Print Magazine

U.S. Medicine is mailed free each month to physicians, pharmacists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and administrators working for Veterans Affairs, Department of Defense and U.S. Public Health Service.

Subscribe Now

Receive Our Email Newsletter

Stay informed about federal medical news, clinical updates and reports on government topics for the federal healthcare professional.

Sign Up