2011 Issues

Can Some Good Come from PTSD or Does the Bad Last for Generations?

WASHINGTON — Can some good eventually come from coping with high levels of psychological stress? Or, does PTSD not only affect returning troops but also their families for generations to come? As researchers grapple with helping troops deal with PTSD,… Read More

Lax Oversight of Outside Care Busts Phoenix VA’s Budget

PHOENIX — Extremely lax oversight of the use of outside care was blamed for a budget crisis at the Phoenix VA Healthcare System, according to a recently-released report from the VA Inspector General. The Arizona health system was forced to… Read More

Army Seeks to Take Back Prescription Drugs to Avoid Medication Abuse Errors

WASHINGTON — The Army is seeking permanent authority to accept unused or old prescription drugs from military healthcare beneficiaries who wish to get rid of them. In January, Gen. Peter Chiarelli, Army vice chief of staff, asked that the Drug… Read More

Award-Winning Army Pharmacist Touts Benefits of Military Service

WASHINGTON — When Army pharmacist Maj. Jeffrey Neigh joined the military, it was initially as a way to pay off his school debts. “I went to Duquesne [University] … in Pittsburgh. I would not have been able to afford to… Read More

HIV Drug Helps Block Herpes Virus

HIV Drug Helps Block Herpes Virus A recent discovery by NIH researchers has shown the mechanism by which an anti-HIV drug can stop the spread of the virus that causes genital herpes. Tenofovir, when applied as a vaginal gel,… Read More

Hepatitis E Threatens Military Forces but U.S. Has Kept It Well-Controlled

Since its discovery in the early 1980s, hepatitis E has been a potent threat to military forces around the world. At one point, the U.S. military was concerned enough to fund intensive research on a vaccine to protect against Hepevirus,… Read More

VA Looks to New Treatment Programs to Combat Alarming Rise in HCV-Related Cancer

Alarmed by a near tripling of the number of veterans developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during the past five years, VA has strengthened its programs for the prevention, screening and treatment of veterans with hepatitis C (HCV), which is a major… Read More

Is Cognitive Therapy Effective for TBI- Evidence Still Inconclusive

WASHINGTON — While there is evidence that cognitive rehabilitation therapy (CRT) has a positive impact on TBI, it is not sufficient to develop guidelines on how to apply this type of therapy to specific patients, according to a recent report… Read More

Adequate Sleep Matters for Soldiers at Risk for Suicide

WASHINGTON — Insomnia symptoms may be an important predictor of suicidal ideation in military troops, a recent study found.1 For the study, researchers evaluated 311 soldiers (255 men and 56 women) who were recruited as part of a treatment study… Read More

Anonymous Surveys Can Be Valuable in Military Mental-Health Screening Study Finds

WASHINGTON — Despite intensive efforts by the military to reduce the stigma of seeking help, troops still might be reluctant to report mental-health problems, suggests a new study of U.S. Army soldiers from one infantry brigade combat team. Troops undergo… Read More

Veteran Nurse Makes Sure VAMC Is Welcoming Facility for Women

WASHINGTON — During her 20-year career as a nurse working at the Washington DC VA Medical Center, L. Gale Bell, RN, has had any number of jobs, but she said none was more satisfying than her current position — Women… Read More

Fund for Chronic Disease Prevention Is Vulnerable Amid Deficit Reduction

WASHINGTON — While some health officials laud the Prevention and Public Health Fund as the nation’s best chance of funneling resources into chronic-disease prevention, it is not clear that the fund can survive deficit-reduction efforts unless it can quickly prove… Read More

RelayHealth wins Blue Button Contest

WASHINGTON – And the winner is….. VA announced that RelayHealth, McKesson’s connectivity business is the winner of the “Blue Button for All Americans” contest. In the content, sponsored by VA’s Innovations Initiative (VAi2), RelayHealth won the $50,000 contest… Read More

Anonymous Surveys Can Be Valuable in Military Mental-Health Screening, Study Finds

WASHINGTON — Despite intensive efforts by the military to reduce the stigma of seeking help, troops still might be reluctant to report mental-health problems, suggests a new study of U.S. Army soldiers from one infantry brigade combat team. Troops undergo… Read More

1918 Flu Virus Circulated Silently Before Becoming Killer

A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests that the flu virus that killed 50 million people worldwide in 1918 “circulated silently” at least four months before the 1918 influenza reached pandemic levels in… Read More