Air Force

After Lackland Bat Infestation, 200 Air Force Trainees Received Rabies Prophylaxis

After Lackland Bat Infestation, 200 Air Force Trainees Received Rabies Prophylaxis

SAN ANTONIO – The largest ever military investigation of rabies exposure involved more than 900 Air Force personnel interviewed and 200 receiving post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) at a cost of about $400,000.

New Mothers May Need Counseling, Training to Pass Postpartum Military Fitness Test

New Mothers May Need Counseling, Training to Pass Postpartum Military Fitness Test

By Annette M. Boyle FAIRFIELD, CA —Many women return to their units after pregnancy with one overriding concern: “Can I pass the fitness test?” The vast majority of those women do end up passing the six-month postpartum test, but their… Read More

Novel Use of Technology Helps Decrease Impact of Wounds of War

By Stephen Spotswood SAN ANTONIO, TX – That soldiers come back from the battlefield bearing permanent reminders of their time there – scars they will live with for the rest of their lives – is taken as a heavy but… Read More

Higher Risk of Brain Lesions For High-Altitude AF Pilots

By Brenda L. Mooney SAN ANTONIO — High-flying U-2 pilots may be paying a neurological price for their service. The elite Air Force pilots flying at high altitudes increase their risks for developing brain lesions, according to a new study,… Read More

Air Force Battles Malignant Melanoma with Enhanced Prevention, Detection, Treatment

By Stephen Spotswood LACKLAND AIR FORCE BASE, TX – One of the most common cancers among active-duty troops, malignant melanoma was diagnosed in 1,788 servicemembers between 2000 and 2011.1 Because military personnel often are required to be outside for prolong… Read More

DoD Budget Seeks to Cut More Than 5,000 Civilian Healthcare Workers Over Five Years

By Sandra Basu WASHINGTON – The DoD plans to cut its civilian workforce by 5% to 6% by the end of fiscal year 2018, including more than 5,000 from the Military Health System. President Barack Obama’s FY 2014 proposed base… Read More

Retired Air Force Urologist, General Officer Urges Doctors to Take Command

By Steve Lewis TEMPLE, TX – Retired Brig. Gen. James T. Turlington, MD, may no longer be an active duty general officer in the Air Force, but he’s still practicing medicine — and still making a difference. In fact, Turlington,… Read More

Air Force Medicine: Averting an Identity Crisis

By Lt. Gen. Thomas W. Travis, Surgeon General, United States Air Force Lt. Gen. Thomas W. Travis U.S. military forces, now in the second decade of war, benefit from the vast achievements Army, Navy and Air Force medics have jointly… Read More

Award-Winning Assistance Adviser Fulfills Life Goal of Helping Vets

By Steve Lewis MADISON, WI — At age 21, Jeffrey Unger said he already had a clear vision of what would become one of his lifelong goals — to help returning veterans get the care they needed. “In my life… Read More

Air Force Pharmacy Uses Survey to Track Energy Drink Consumption

“People think that if something is available over the counter, [then] it’s safe. That’s not necessarily true. Any product with caffeine will increase respiration and heart rate, and its diuretic effects can cause dehydration.” — Lt. Col. Nicholas Milazzo, chief… Read More

Air Force Says Changes to F-22 Aircraft Will Let Pilots Breathe Easier in Flight

By Sandra Basu WASHINGTON — Pilots will be able to breathe easier as a result of changes to the oxygen systems in the F-22 aircraft, Air Force officials recently assured a House committee. The F-22 fleet has been under intense… Read More

Air Force Nurse Distinguishes Herself On and Off the Battlefield

By Steve Lewis JOINT BASE ANDREWS, MD — While deployed to Afghanistan, Air Force Capt. Gina Fasciani, RN, BSN, wasn’t afraid to don battle gear and leave her bunker to take care of patients. “While under indirect fire, she [left]… Read More

Servicemembers Lose Benefits after Improper Discharges for Alleged Personality Disorders

By Stephen Spotswood WASHINGTON — The U.S. military continues to use improper processes to diagnose significant numbers of servicemembers with pre-existing personality disorders (PD) and then discharge them, according to government documents obtained by an advocacy group. The Vietnam Veterans… Read More

Report Prompted by Fort Hood Shooting Calls DoD Physician Credentialing Inadequate

By Sandra Basu WASHINGTON — Reporting the results of an investigation begun after an Army physician opened fire and shot more than 40 people at Fort Hood in 2009, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) says the military services need to… Read More

Medical Lessons Since 911 Impact Patient Care Aeromedical Evacuation

Through more than a decade of sustained combat, the men and women of the Air Force Medical Service have answered our nation’s call and maintained a standard of excellence second to none. Since the war began, the innovations and advancements… Read More

New BRAC-Mandated Medical Center Locations Creating Traffic Gridlock

WASHINGTON — The new Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC) and the Fort Belvoir Community Hospital (FBCH) are both designed to offer state-of-the-art medical care – assuming staff and patients can ever get to them. New signage for Wilford… Read More

Many Servicemembers Who Commit Suicide Have Never Seen Battle

Jonathan Woodson, MD WASHINGTON — When servicemembers commit suicide, a common misperception is that the extreme act is a response to traumatic battlefield experiences. In reality, many, if not most, military personnel who kill themselves have never been… Read More

Fortuitous Mass-Casualty Training at Pentagon Saved Lives 10 Years Ago

Retired Lt. Gen. (Dr.) Paul K. Carlton Jr., right, directs responders after the Pentagon attack Sept. 11, 2011. WASHINGTON — Mass-casualty management planning that occurred at the Pentagon in the months and days before 9/11 helped medical personnel respond appropriately… Read More

Tattoos, Uniforms Don’t Always Go Together, So MTFs Busy Removing Skin Art

WASHINGTON — Many young people of enlistment age have tattoos, and some percentage are required to remove body art that the military services deem inappropriate. That sometimes can be a time-consuming, if not difficult, medical process. Some tattoo inks are… Read More

Resilience Programs Have Mushroomed in Military, But Do They Work?

WASHINGTON — The U.S. military has implemented programs and strategies to promote psychological resilience among troops as stress from the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has taken a toll. Little is known, however, about the effectiveness of those programs,… Read More