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Most Army Special Forces Musculoskeletal Injuries Preventable

PITTSBURGH – A significant proportion of injuries among Special Operations Forces (SOF) in the Army can be classified as preventable and may be mitigated with human performance programs, according to a study. The study, published recently in Military Medicine, noted… Read More

Native Americans, Alaskans More Likely to Have Higher HbA1c Levels

OAKLAND, CA – American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) are more than twice as likely to have diabetes as non-Hispanic Caucasians, and the prevalence of diabetes in the AI/AN populations has increased by more than 68% since 1994. A study… Read More

‘Precision Medicine’ Approach Helps Predict Who Will Develop Diabetes

ANN ARBOR, MI – A new “precision medicine” approach to diabetes prevention uses existing information such as blood sugar levels and waist-to-hip ratios, rather than a genetic test, to determine who has the highest risk of developing the disease. The… Read More

Black Women Working the Night Shift More Likely to Develop Diabetes

BEDFORD, MA – African-American women who work night shifts are significantly more likely to develop diabetes, and their risk increases the longer they work that schedule. That’s according to a new study published in Diabetolgia, which notes that the increased… Read More

Remote Evaluation Possible for MS Patients

WASHINGTON – Traveling to VA testing centers can be difficult for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. What if, instead, the testing could be done remotely? That’s what a study led by researchers from the Washington DC VAMC sought to find out.… Read More

No Higher Breast Cancer Rates Among Transgender Veterans

JOHNSON CITY, TN – Consistent with past European studies, new research from the Mountain Home VAMC suggests that transgender (TG) veterans have no higher rates of breast cancer than others. The study, published recently in the journal Breast Cancer Research… Read More

More Breast Cancer Patients Opt for Mastectomy Than Previously

NASHVILLE – Many more breast cancer patients now opt for mastectomy, including removal of both breasts, instead of choosing breast conservation surgery (BCS), even with early-stage disease confined to one breast, according to a new study. The rates of increase… Read More

Direct Visual Observation Therapy Relieves Phantom-Limb Pain

BETHESDA, MD – With as many as one-third of unilateral=limb amputees suffering regularly from phantom limb pain, military medicine has been in search of an inexpensive and effective treatment. A study published recently in the Annals of Clinical and Translational… Read More

Insomnia Doubles Risk of Chronic Diseases in Servicemembers

BETHESDA, MD – Chronic insomnia doubles the risk of developing hypertension and type 2 diabetes in servicemembers compared to military personnel who have not been diagnosed with that sleep problem. That’s according to a report in Medical Surveillance Monthly Report… Read More

Mindfulness Training Helps Vets with Diabetes

PITTSBURGH – Veterans who participated in mindfulness training lowered their diabetes-related distress and glucose levels while improving their self-management of the disease, according to a new study. The training included focused breathing and awareness training, according to the research presented… Read More

Pituitary Dysfunction Related to Blast TBI

CHICAGO – Pituitary dysfunction after blast injury may be an important, under-recognized, and potentially treatable source of symptoms in servicemembers who survive traumatic brain injury (TBI) from blast exposure, according to a new study. The research was presented recently at… Read More

Rapid Vaccination Can Prevent Deaths, Costs in Flu Pandemic

STANFORD, CA – Rapid vaccination is key to averting deaths and saving tens of millions of dollars in treatment costs from a severe influenza pandemic occurring with a strain as lethal as human influenza A (H7N9), according to a dynamic… Read More

Flu Outbreak on Navy Ship Despite Mandatory Vaccinations

SAN DIEGO – Since the 1950s, a policy of mandatory annual vaccination for active duty personnel has been largely successful in limiting influenza epidemics in the military. The current DoD influenza vaccination policy mandates that all uniformed personnel receive seasonal… Read More

Despite High Costs, VA Makes Sure Veterans Have Access to Newest HCV Drugs

Despite High Costs, VA Makes Sure Veterans Have Access to Newest HCV Drugs

By Annette M. Boyle WASHINGTON – While commercial insurers responded to the approval of the breakthrough drug sofosbuvir for hepatitis C (HCV) by implementing prescribing restrictions, limiting use to the sickest patients and charging higher co-pays because of the drug’s… Read More

Canakinumab Is Option for Patients Intolerant of Other Therapy

SAN DIEGO – Treating gouty arthritis is problematic in patients who have contraindications for, or are unresponsive or intolerant of, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or colchicine. A new study has found, however, that canakinumab (CAN), a selective, fully human, anti-IL-1β… Read More

High Serum Uric Acid Associated with AF

High Serum Uric Acid Associated with AF MIAMI – What is the relationship between atrial fibrillation (AF) and high serum uric acid (SUA)? Noting that AF is related to oxidative stress, neurohormonal activation and inflammatory activation and that SUA is… Read More

Infection Risk Similar with Non-Anti-TNF Agents for RA

BIRMINGHAM, AL – The comparative risk of infection associated with non-anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) biologic agents appeared to be similar to anti-TNF biologic agents in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a new veterans study. TheArthritis Care & Research study, led… Read More

What Is The Best Predictor of Heart Disease in CKD Patients?

BALTIMORE – The best indicator of the risk of heart disease in kidney disease patients appears to be calcium buildup in the coronary arteries as opposed to other risk factors, according to a new study. The findings were reported recently… Read More

New Guidelines Published for Renal Artery Stenting

CLEVELAND – Patients traditionally excluded from modern clinical trials could benefit from renal artery stenting to open blockages in the renal arteries, according to new recommendations. The report, published online by the journal Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, was led by… Read More

Psychological Distress Affects Prostate Cancer Screening

BOSTON – As the debate continues about the benefit of routine prostate cancer screening, a new VA study raises a new concern: the role of psychological distress in the process. The study, led by researchers from the VA Boston Healthcare… Read More