Battlefield Medicine

Pain Is a Growing Issue for Troops and Veterans; Safer Remedies Sought

Pain Is a Growing Issue for Troops and Veterans; Safer Remedies Sought

WASHINGTON – Trauma-related pain – both acute and chronic — has always been a universal problem among war-injured troops.

Military Focuses on Pre-Hospital Care to Further Improve Care of Injured Warriors

Military Focuses on Pre-Hospital Care to Further Improve Care of Injured Warriors

WASHINGTON – Despite all of the progress in battlefield medicine during the past 50 years, the greatest challenge remains how to keep critically injured military personnel alive until they can actually get to a hospital.

Warrior Transition Units Go Beyond Physical Recovery for Wounded Soldiers

By Sandra Basu WASHINGTON — For Capt. Edward “Flip” Klein, Oct. 22, 2012, was a life-changing moment. Deployed in Afghanistan, he was struck by a roadside bomb that resulted in the loss of both of his legs above the knee,… Read More

Simulation Training Duplicates Experience of Shipboard Trauma Care

SAN DIEGO — When a servicemember experiences physical trauma during deployment, it’s usually during circumstances that are loud, chaotic and happening at a speed too quickly to be followed by the untrained eye. The same is true of treating trauma… Read More

Battlefield Lessons Save Lives, Limbs after Boston Marathon Explosions

Annette M. Boyle SAN ANTONIO, TX – Ten years ago, many of the survivors of the Boston Marathon bombing with major lower body injuries would likely have spent the rest of their lives in a wheelchair. A new — and… Read More

Rabies Exposure Reports Skyrocket in Theater After Army Cracks Down on Pets

By Annette M. Boyle ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, MD – While adopting a stray dog or a wild monkey might seem to be a relatively harmless way to boost a military unit’s morale, in countries such as Afghanistan, a nip or… Read More

Telephone Therapies Helped Elderly Veterans in Pain

Telephone Therapies Helped Elderly Veterans in Pain SAN FRANCISCO — Telephone-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and education (EDU) were helpful in management of chronic pain in older military veterans, according to a new study which calls for further study of… Read More

Compound Provides Noninvasive Battlefield Pain Relief

FORT BRAGG, NC — Oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate (OTFC) is a rapid and noninvasive pain-management strategy that provides safe and effective analgesia in the pre-hospital battlefield setting, according to a new study.1 The authors of the report, which appeared in… Read More

Amygdala Volume Associated with Combat Veterans’ PTSD

Amygdala Volume Associated with Combat Veterans’ PTSD DURHAM, NC — Combat veterans with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) tend to have significantly smaller volume in an area of the brain critical for regulating fear and anxiety responses, according to a… Read More

Learning More About Spinal Injuries in Wounded Servicemembers

FORT SAM HOUSTON, TX –Even though spinal injuries can be extremely disabling for wounded servicemembers, exactly how the injuries occur and what damage they cause has not been fully understood. A new study recently published in the Journal of Bone… Read More

Higher Chest Injury Mortality Linked to Better Transport of Wounded

HOUSTON — Wounded patients with battlefield chest injuries sustained in Afghanistan and Iraq had higher mortality rates than did patients during the Korean and Vietnam wars, but that likely was because better transport and triage got more of the severely… Read More

Researchers Investigate Ways to Jointly Treat PTSD, TBI Subhead: Two Conditions Often Co-Morbid in Returning Troops

By Stephen Spotswood BOSTON – PTSD and TBI are frequently co-morbid in veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan – so frequently that physicians are surprised when they find one without the other. And yet the two injuries are still mostly thought… Read More

Invasive Fungal Infections Complicate Treatment, Increase Mortality of IED-Wounded Servicemembers

By Brenda L. Mooney U.S. Marine Cpl. Sean Grady, a dog handler and pointman with Echo Company, 1st Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, and Ace, an improvised explosive device detection dog, pause for a break while sweeping a chokepoint during a… Read More

Invasive Fungal Infections Complicate Treatment, Increase Mortality of IED-Wounded Servicemembers

By Brenda L. Mooney BETHESDA, MD – Invasive fungal wound infections are on the increase in military personnel wounded by improvised explosive devices, leading to significant morbidity and even death in some cases where the victims initially survived. David R.… Read More

No Longer Just a Horse Drug, Ketamine Increasingly Used for Military Pain Management

Annette M. Boyle ROCKVILLE, MD — Morphine has met its match — and then some. After 200 years as the gold standard in battlefield analgesia, morphine is increasingly giving way to ketamine, a phencyclidine (PCP) derivative initially used in veterinary… Read More

Bill Seeks to Remove Barriers Keeping Military Medics from Getting Civilian Jobs

By Sandra Basu WASHINGTON — While military medics have been hailed for their bravery and lifesaving skills on the battlefield, many are out of work once they leave the military. Nearly 100,000 Army veterans applied for unemployment in FY 2011,… Read More

Military Medicine Comes Up with Novel Treatments for Phantom Limb: Pain Persists After Amputation

By Sandra Basu WASHINGTON — In October 2010, Marine Lance Cpl. Sebastian Gallegos stepped into a canal in Afghanistan just as a comrade stumbled onto an improvised explosive device (IED). The impact blew Gallegos forward and almost severed his arm.… Read More

Can Virtual Reality Help Veterans Avoid As Well As Recover from PTSD?

By Stephen Spotswood  BETHESDA, MD — Research rooted in treating trauma in the civilian sector is examining how a combination of pharmaceuticals and virtual reality can help combat veterans recover more swiftly from chronic PTSD. Barbara Rothbaum, PhD, director of… Read More

TXA Improves Cuagulopathy in Troops Injured in Battle

The use of Tranexamic Acid (TXA) with blood component-based resuscitation following combat injury results in improved measures of cuagulopathy and survival, a recent study has concluded, leading to the use of the agent in casualty care for U.S. troops. For… Read More

Pilot Program at Memphis VA Promises Patients Greater Autonomy after Spinal-Cord Injuries

By Annette M. Boyle MEMPHIS, TN — A pilot program in Memphis is bringing VA closer to meeting what perhaps is the greatest desire for its 42,000 veterans with spinal-cord injuries and disorders: more control of their environment. This month,… Read More