Category: Psychiatry

Congress Asks: In Wake of Court Ruling, Should VA Do More to Push Troubled Veterans Into Treatment?

WASHINGTON — Does VA need to employ more aggressive tactics when it comes to getting veterans struggling with PTSD, depression and s ubstance abuse into treatment?  Should some of those tactics involve using disability benefits as an incentive to receive… Read More

Study: High Combat Activity Producing Epidemic of Acute Stress in Afghanistan

WASHINGTON — Acute stress is rampant among troops in Afghanistan who are experiencing “a dramatic increase” in the levels of combat activity, according to a recent study. The study found that stress and combat activity were significantly higher than levels… Read More

Army Brings Behavioral Health Programs Into Schools to Better Reach Children Struggling With Parental Deployment

Washington – More than 700,000 children have had one or more parent deployed to the Iraq or Afghanistan theaters of operation, and recent studies indicate that those children suffer significant rates of behavioral and stress disorders, according to a recent… Read More

Army Battles Sexual Assault Within Troops, Improves Follow-Up Care of Victims

WASHINGTON—Not that long ago, a woman who had been sexually assaulted might have gone to an Army Military Treatment Facility (MTF), had a forensic examination and then would go home without anyone at the MTF knowing what became of her.… Read More

Psychiatric Issues in HCV-Infected Veterans Must Be Managed With Underlying Disease

Managing the physical disease alone is not enough with veterans infected with hepatitis C and who also have high rates of mental health conditions. Addressing the psychiatric issues is especially critical when interferon-based therapies—where depression is a contraindicatio—are the preferred… Read More

Schizophrenia Increases Complexity of Aiding Veterans Without Homes

While no one is certain how many homeless veterans suffer from schizophrenia, experts agree that their numbers are significant—and because of the nature of their illness and living conditions, they often present with a variety of health care challenges. … Read More

Researchers Explore Enzyme That Can Both Increase, Decrease Memory

BETHESDA, MD—A new study into the biochemical mechanisms that control memory has added to the hope that someday scientists will be able to strengthen a person’s ability to remember through chemical intervention. NIH-funded researchers at the SUNY Downstate Medical Center… Read More

Inexpensive Toolkit Helps Prevent Alzheimer’s-Related Home Safety Problems, Mishaps

WASHINGTON, DC—A simple $76 toolkit with items typically found at any neighborhood hardware store has shown promise in increasing home safety for Alzheimer’s disease patients and reducing the strain on overburdened caregivers. It could be solution to one of the… Read More

Even Veterans With mTBI More at Risk for Dementia

WASHINGTON, DC—Since an Institute of Medicine report in 2008, there has been significant consensus that penetrating and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases the risk for dementia later in life. The evidence was not as strong linking mild TBI (mTBI)… Read More

TBI Symptoms, Severity Differ for Women Veterans But Cause Remains A Mystery

WASHINGTON, DC—As more data is emerging on the short and long-term effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI), researchers are discovering that the injury affects women differently than it does men. Most notably, there seems to be a differential pattern of… Read More

Technology Makes For Efficient Application Of New mTBI Policy

WASHINGTON, DC—Last summer, DoD issued a policy designed to speed detection of mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) on the battlefield. Now, using new technologies to make the process as efficient as possible, the policy is being implemented in theater, according… Read More

Marine Recovery Needs Better Medical, Non-Medical Integration

WASHINGTON, DC—The military has to improve integrating medical and non-medical support for injured servicemembers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, said Col John Mayer, commander of the USMC Wounded Warrior Regiment. Mayer and his team provide non-medical support to wounded, ill,… Read More

New Law Creates National Plan to Combat Alzheimer’s

WASHINGTON,DC—For the first time since federal research agencies began conducting research on Alzheimer’s disease (AD), there is a national plan designed to focus those efforts. Last month, President Obama signed into law a bill creating a National Alzheimer’s Project within… Read More

Interagency Tribal Listening Sessions Address Suicide Prevention

WASHINGTON, DC—IHS, SAMHSA, and the Department of the Interior’s Indian Affairs have been holding tribal listening sessions across Indian country to seek input on how the agencies can most effectively work within American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities to… Read More

Study Finds Soldiers Benefit from Pre-deployment Screening and Coordination of Care in Theater

PENTAGON—A newly published study shows that psychiatric and behavioral health disorders were reduced by 78% in Army brigades that underwent a pre-deployment health screening program that focused on screening and then linking soldiers to care in theater, if needed. The… Read More

Few Answers, Much Potential in Alzheimer’s Research

WASHINGTON, DC—“A cure for Alzheimer’s (AD) has not been found on my watch, but the momentum is there,” said Marcelle Morrison-Bogorad, PhD, at what might be her last opportunity to speak before Congress as the director of the National Institute… Read More