Research

Living With a Mystery Disease: One Woman’s Story

At 31, Susan Thornton developed an itchy rash around her waist.

Opioid Use Generally Moderate in OEF, OIF, OND Veterans

LITTLE ROCK, AR — With continuing concern about opioid use in veterans, especially those serving in Afghanistan (OEF) and Iraq (OIF and OND), a new study provided a detailed analysis of the issue.

Alcohol Abuse, PTSD Can Be Treated Simultaneously

DURHAM, NC — Many servicemembers and veterans seeking treatment for alcohol problems have experienced the life-threatening stress of combat, many have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and many servicemembers and veterans seeking treatment for PTSD also have alcohol or other substance problems.

New Soldiers’ Alcohol Abuse Linked to Mental Disorders

LA JOLLA, CA— Problem drinking that predates enlistment into military service might be a contributor to the overall burden of alcohol misuse and mental disorders in the U.S. Armed Forces, but evidence remains somewhat limited.

Melanoma Mortality Trends Vary By States, Region

Whether death rates from melanoma are going up or down in the United States depends on the state and region, according to a research letter published online by JAMA Dermatology.

Metformin Might Improve Colorectal Cancer Survival

Recent clinical studies have suggested that the common diabetes drug metformin holds promise in improving colorectal cancer survival, but the small number of patients and inconsistencies related to diabetic severity have limited the significance of that research.

New Study Finds More Evidence of Burn Pit, Respiratory Illness Connection

New Study Finds More Evidence of Burn Pit, Respiratory Illness Connection

For years, multiple veterans’ groups have contended that burn-pit exposure in Iraq and Afghanistan increased the risk of long-term health problems.

VA Work Inspired Radiologist’s Research, Book About Mitochondrial Issues

VA Work Inspired Radiologist’s Research, Book About Mitochondrial Issues

Mark Hom, MD, says he began seriously thinking about the biology behind fitness during a “midlife crisis.”

VA Study Questions Pathogenesis of GERD

VA Study Questions Pathogenesis of GERD

DALLAS—A small, single-center study led by researchers from the Dallas VAMC suggests that gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) might be caused by an immune reaction, rather than direct chemical injury from stomach acids. Results were published online recently as a “Preliminary… Read More

Intense Exercise Improves Erectile Function Despite Race

DURHAM, NC—With a growing interest in using exercise to treat a variety of conditions, many studies have highlighted the relationship between better erectile function and physical activity but, in general, black men have been underrepresented in the research. To remedy… Read More

Testosterone Replacement Not Linked to DVT, PE

KANSAS CITY, MO—With testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) prescriptions increasing several-fold in the last decade, concerns have been raised about a possible increased incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). Because data is lacking on the association between… Read More

Study Determines Patients Most Vulnerable to E. Coli H30

MINNEAPOLIS—The pandemic strain of drug-resistant E. coli H30 begins as a subtle, hard-to-detect infection, usually of the urinary tract. The strain is of special concern, however, according to a report in Clinical Infectious Diseases, because it appears to have an… Read More

Hormone Deficiencies Common in Concussion Patients

SEATTLE—Hormonal changes related to explosive blast-related concussions often cause military veterans to suffer sleep disturbance, fatigue, depression and poor quality of life, according to a new study. The research evaluating hormone levels in 41 male veterans who had been deployed… Read More

High False-Negative Rate in Cognitive Screening

SAN DIEGO—Existing screening tools for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) miss too many confirming diagnoses, according to a new study. An article published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease reports a false-negative error rate of 7%. Researchers at University of California… Read More