Research

President Proposes Slightly Larger Budget for NIH; Focus on New Research

WASHINGTON—The President’s proposed budget for FY 2012 includes no deep cuts in HHS agencies, and even includes a small increase for NIH research. But that increase is tiny in comparison to the boost in research dollars that was provided through… Read More

Survey: Women Veterans Dissatisfied with VA Care, Especially Sexual Trauma Screening for New Enrollees

WASHINGTON—Women veterans are dissatisfied with many of the services provided through the VA health-care system, including screening processes for military sexual trauma (MST) that new enrollees receive, according to a survey conducted by the American Legion. While VA mandates that… Read More

Despite Success in Managing Warfarin Usage, VA’s Anticoagulation Units’ Role Likely to Change With New Drugs

Some 148,000 patients in the VA system receive anticoagulation therapy to prevent and treat cardiac disease, stroke and deep vein thrombosis (DVT), but the primary anticoagulation drug, Warfarin, which has been in use since the 1950s, is complex to manage,… Read More

Where There’s Smoke: DoD Investigates Causes of Deployment-Related Pulmonary Symptoms Reported by Troops

The media headlines are almost as incendiary as the dramatic pictures of burn pits splashed across the front page. Blamed for generally harmful and even potentially toxic exposure, burn pits have become a focus of speculation in media outlets from… Read More

Numbers May Be Small, But Difficulty Managing Crohn’s Disease is Big Concern

Although the number of Crohn’s disease patients in the VHA and TRICARE systems is relatively small, the notoriously complex disease provides large challenges for the physicians who treat it. In fiscal year 2009, the Military Health System diagnosed… Read More

How Long Before Early Adoption of Insulin Becomes Rule Instead of Exception for Difficult to Control Type 2 Diabetes?

Improved glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes is grounded in lifestyle modifications and pharmacologic therapy. Whether to introduce insulin early as a pharmacotherapy for patients with type 2 diabetes is a question that doesn’t have an easy, pat… Read More

New Self-Assessment Tool Helps Physicians Monitor HIV Medication Adherence

When it comes to treatment adherence, HIV is far from the easiest disease to manage. The sheer number of medications, combined with the precision with which they must be taken, can stymie patients and physicians alike. While this fact has… Read More

More Effective Diagnosis Methods Are Critical in Reducing Lung Cancer Mortality

One of the greatest challenges in treating lung cancer is diagnosing the disease early enough to treat effectively. That’s why any new research on early indicators of the disease —such as a recent study on the relationship of smoking cessation… Read More

With No MS Cure in Sight, VA Centers of Excellence Seek to Maximize Treatment

No cure is on the horizon for multiple sclerosis (MS), the pathology of which remains a mystery to researchers. The unpredictable disease, which degrades the insulating myelin of nerves, can strike with varying speeds, to varying degrees of severity, and… Read More

Although Herpes Zoster Rates Have Nearly Doubled in VA, Vaccination Levels Remain Extremely Low

The incidence of herpes zoster (shingles) in veterans seeking care at VA hospitals continues its steady increase, rising even since a 2010 report documented a near doubling of the rate using VHA Decision Support System data from 2000 to 2007.… Read More

Benefits of Robotic Stroke Rehab May Be Less Than Anticipated

WASHINGTON, DC—This time last year, a group of VA-funded researchers at MIT announced that they had developed a robot-assisted therapy for stroke patients that greatly improved patient outcome without significantly raising costs. In chronic stroke survivors, robot-assisted therapy led to… Read More

VA Facilities Exception to Rule with Stroke Belt Mortality

WASHINGTON, DC—Higher risk for post-stroke mortality in the so-called “Stroke Belt” does not seem to apply in VA facilities, according to recent research which cited increased awareness and best practice guidelines as making the difference. Researchers have recognized since the… Read More

Researchers Explore Enzyme That Can Both Increase, Decrease Memory

BETHESDA, MD—A new study into the biochemical mechanisms that control memory has added to the hope that someday scientists will be able to strengthen a person’s ability to remember through chemical intervention. NIH-funded researchers at the SUNY Downstate Medical Center… Read More

Inexpensive Toolkit Helps Prevent Alzheimer’s-Related Home Safety Problems, Mishaps

WASHINGTON, DC—A simple $76 toolkit with items typically found at any neighborhood hardware store has shown promise in increasing home safety for Alzheimer’s disease patients and reducing the strain on overburdened caregivers. It could be solution to one of the… Read More

Indian Tradition of Family Care Can Delay Diagnosis, Help for Caregivers

WASHINGTON, DC—Risks for dementia are on the rise among American Indian and Alaska Natives (AI/AN), but cultural traditions sometimes have led to delayed diagnosis and, therefore, inadequate help for family caregivers, according to Indian Health Service (IHS) experts. “I think… Read More

Even Veterans With mTBI More at Risk for Dementia

WASHINGTON, DC—Since an Institute of Medicine report in 2008, there has been significant consensus that penetrating and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases the risk for dementia later in life. The evidence was not as strong linking mild TBI (mTBI)… Read More

Statewide Initiative Uses VA Model To Improve Cardiovascular Care

BETHESDA, MD—Due to its ability to track patient health data within its system and to orchestrate initiatives inside what is essentially a unified healthcare program, VA has played a pioneering role in showing how chronic disease treatment, such as for… Read More

Public Health Officials Optimistic About Dengue Fever Vaccine in A Few Years

WASHINGTON, DC—With two-fifths of the world’s population at risk for dengue fever, a severe flu-like illness which sometimes leads to fatal complications, the development of a vaccine has long been an important, albeit elusive, goal in managing the disease. Now,… Read More

VA Spending on Chronic Diseases Reflects Treatment Changes Over Last Decade

WASHINGTON, DC—The fastest growing segment of patients treated at the nation’s VA facilities are those with four or more chronic diseases, increasing from 15% to 22% in an eight-year period ending in 2008, according to a recent study. That contributed… Read More

DoD Provides New Grant to Study Simultaneous Vaccination Techniques

BLUE BELL, PA—Rapid vaccination of military forces may be necessary with emerging infectious disease and pandemic threats, but injecting combination vaccines that are formulated together can sometimes result in immune interference. In an effort to solve that dilemma, the DoD… Read More

Recent Coagulation Studies

Blood Markers of Inflammation, Blood Clotting and Blood Vessel Function in HIV-infected Adults Purpose: This study will collect information about markers of inflammation, blood clotting and blood vessel function in HIV-infected adults and healthy volunteers. Certain markers of inflammation, blood… Read More

Recent Oncology Studies

Vitamin D Supplementation in Veterans with Early-Stage Prostate Cancer Objective: Vitamin D promotes the differentiation of prostate cancer cells, maintains the differentiated phenotype of prostate epithelial cells, and can induce prostate cancer cell death, raising the possibility that vitamin D… Read More