Category: Research

NIH Funds Help DCVAMC, Partners Tackle Health Disparities

WASHINGTON, DC—“Historically, it takes many years and lots of research money to go from the initial concept—an idea created in a lab—to the few of those trials that are successful and actually change clinical practice,” said Marc Blackman, MD. Blackman,… Read More

New Law Creates National Plan to Combat Alzheimer’s

WASHINGTON,DC—For the first time since federal research agencies began conducting research on Alzheimer’s disease (AD), there is a national plan designed to focus those efforts. Last month, President Obama signed into law a bill creating a National Alzheimer’s Project within… Read More

Workshop Focuses on Post-deployment Issues Facing Servicemembers and Veterans

WASHINGTON, DC—Asking servicemembers and veteran patients about sleep can serve as a segue to conversations about other post-deployment issues that these patients might be experiencing, said Paula Domenici, PhD. Domenici is a licensed counseling psychologist who heads the Division of… Read More

Pharmacogenomic Advances Result in Label Changes Decades after Approval

BETHESDA, MD—Even drugs that have been on the market for years, sometimes decades, are not immune from reexamination and relabeling brought about by new scientific discoveries. In the field of pharmacogenomics especially, new opportunities are presenting themselves to use new… Read More

Navy Medical Researchers Tackle ETEC Vaccine

WASHINGTON, DC—Diarrheal illnesses are among the most common nonbattle-related illnesses that troops experience when they go overseas, yet there is no vaccine against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), a common cause of bacterial diarrhea. Researchers at the Naval Medical Research Center… Read More

Study Finds Increasing Trend in CDI Among Hospitalized Children

WASHINGTON, DC—Hospitalized children in the US are becoming infected with the bacteria Clostridium difficile (CDI) more frequently, according to researchers from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU) and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. The findings of the… Read More

Study Finds Soldiers Benefit from Pre-deployment Screening and Coordination of Care in Theater

PENTAGON—A newly published study shows that psychiatric and behavioral health disorders were reduced by 78% in Army brigades that underwent a pre-deployment health screening program that focused on screening and then linking soldiers to care in theater, if needed. The… Read More

Recent Women’s Health Studies

A Randomized Controlled Trial on Women’s Substance Abuse Treatment (WPR) Purpose: To examine the efficacy of an evidence-based gender-specific treatment model for women veterans with substance use disorder (SUD). Sponsor: Department of Veterans Affairs ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT00734903 Olaparib in Combination… Read More

Recent Immunology Studies

Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment Objective: To find out if the chance of developing a serious illness or of getting AIDS is less if patients start taking HIV medicines at a time when their CD4-positive cell count is still fairly… Read More

Few Answers, Much Potential in Alzheimer’s Research

WASHINGTON, DC—“A cure for Alzheimer’s (AD) has not been found on my watch, but the momentum is there,” said Marcelle Morrison-Bogorad, PhD, at what might be her last opportunity to speak before Congress as the director of the National Institute… Read More

Research Needed on Stress in Combat Medics

BETHESDA, MD—Where do you find resiliency as a healer and a soldier? As the role of combat medics becomes more and more important to the increasing survival rate of combat casualties, that is a question that military psychiatrists are asking.… Read More

Mild Brain Trauma Could Have Links to Alzheimer’s

BETHESDA, MD—It was two years ago that Ira Katz, MD, PhD, then chief of VA’s mental health services, told researchers at the VISN 20 Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC) in Portland, OR, that they should begin focusing… Read More

Military Challenged to Provide Far-Forward Mental Health Care

BETHESDA, MD—For a handful of military mental health providers on the front lines, treating combat stress and trauma is an everyday occurrence. The military has begun to realize that the advice and care they furnish can often prevent acute battlefield… Read More

Researchers Identifying Gender Differences in Combat Trauma

BETHESDA, MD—Women comprise nearly 20-percent of the military. Many women, like their male counterparts, return from combat traumatized by the events they experienced. Researchers and healthcare providers are beginning to recognize that gender plays a large role in how veterans… Read More

Surgeon General Report Details the Biology of Smoking Damage

WASHINGTON, DC—While the overall negative health effects of smoking have been common knowledge for many years, a newly-released Surgeon General’s report goes into unprecedented detail on how tobacco causes disease at a biological and behavioral level. The report gives fuel… Read More

Taking Smoking Cessation to All Care Settings, VA Lowers Smoking Rate

WASHINGTON, DC—No one has ever said that quitting smoking was easy. For servicemembers and veterans, who may already be under considerable stress, giving up something they perceive as relieving their stress can be especially tough. VA recognizes this and, over… Read More

Combining Smoking Cessation with PTSD Therapy Boosts Quit Rates

WASHINGTON, DC—Smoking cessation treatment that is made part of mental healthcare for veterans with PTSD improves quit rates, according to a VA study published in the December 8 Journal of the American Medical Association. “The smoking cessation techniques used in… Read More

NIH Director Supports Dissolution of NIDA, NIAAA and Creation of Single Addiction Institute

BETHESDA, MD—NIH is examining the possibility of creating a single institute for substance use, abuse, and addiction research. The new institute would combine the relevant research portfolios dealing with those issues currently under the purview of NIDA, NIAAA, and other… Read More

Research Needed in How Combat Trauma Affects Families

BETHESDA, MD—“Combat injury is not an event. It’s a process.” Those words, spoken by Stephen Cozza, MD, associate director of the USUHS Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, could have been taken as the central theme of DCoE’s Trauma… Read More

Staffer in the Spotlight: Addiction Researcher Builds Career in VA Searching for Vaccine

Thomas Kosten has been fascinated by the mechanisms of addiction since his first year as a medical student. While working through the MD/PhD program at Cornell Medical School, Kosten became interested in the field of opioid dependence, working in the… Read More