Research

Physicians Need to Use More Discretion on Twitter, Study Suggests

WASHINGTON, DC—Today’s physicians need greater accountability and more guidelines concerning their use of Twitter®, according to a study by the Washington DC VA Medical Center. The study was published in the February 9 issue of the Journal of American Medicine.… Read More

Recent Endocrinology Studies

Endocrine Studies in Health and Disease Objective: This study will evaluate healthy normal volunteers and patients with a variety of endocrine disorders to 1) learn more about conditions that affect the endocrine glands (glands that secrete hormones) and 2) train… Read More

Recent Psychiatric Studies

Effects of Omega-3 EPA/DHA for Soldiers at Risk for Mood Disorders Purpose: Stress-related disorders are among the most prevalent and expensive medical consequences of participation in military operations. Omega-3 fatty acids EPA/DHA derived from fish oil are known to benefit… Read More

Surgeon General Urges Call to Action on Breastfeeding

WASHINGTON, DC—Despite ample evidence that breastfeeding a child for the first six months of his or her life provides benefits that far outweigh those gained by formula feeding, the majority of American mothers abandon breastfeeding too soon, or do not… Read More

Pharmaceutical Solutions Lag Behind Growth in Childhood Obesity

BETHESDA, MD—With the continuing rise in the rates of diabetes and obesity, researchers are exerting more and more effort to find a viable pharmaceutical treatment to combat weight gain. The pediatric population is especially at risk. Obesity in children and… Read More

Panel Tackles Psychological Health and Obesity in Children

WASHINGTON, DC—Obesity and psychological problems are taking a toll on children. How can health providers, federal agencies, schools, and other entities address these issues in young people? Private and public sector officials discussed solutions to these issues at a forum… Read More

NIH Funds Help DCVAMC, Partners Tackle Health Disparities

WASHINGTON, DC—“Historically, it takes many years and lots of research money to go from the initial concept—an idea created in a lab—to the few of those trials that are successful and actually change clinical practice,” said Marc Blackman, MD. Blackman,… Read More

New Law Creates National Plan to Combat Alzheimer’s

WASHINGTON,DC—For the first time since federal research agencies began conducting research on Alzheimer’s disease (AD), there is a national plan designed to focus those efforts. Last month, President Obama signed into law a bill creating a National Alzheimer’s Project within… Read More

Workshop Focuses on Post-deployment Issues Facing Servicemembers and Veterans

WASHINGTON, DC—Asking servicemembers and veteran patients about sleep can serve as a segue to conversations about other post-deployment issues that these patients might be experiencing, said Paula Domenici, PhD. Domenici is a licensed counseling psychologist who heads the Division of… Read More

Pharmacogenomic Advances Result in Label Changes Decades after Approval

BETHESDA, MD—Even drugs that have been on the market for years, sometimes decades, are not immune from reexamination and relabeling brought about by new scientific discoveries. In the field of pharmacogenomics especially, new opportunities are presenting themselves to use new… Read More

Navy Medical Researchers Tackle ETEC Vaccine

WASHINGTON, DC—Diarrheal illnesses are among the most common nonbattle-related illnesses that troops experience when they go overseas, yet there is no vaccine against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), a common cause of bacterial diarrhea. Researchers at the Naval Medical Research Center… Read More

Study Finds Increasing Trend in CDI Among Hospitalized Children

WASHINGTON, DC—Hospitalized children in the US are becoming infected with the bacteria Clostridium difficile (CDI) more frequently, according to researchers from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU) and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. The findings of the… Read More

Study Finds Soldiers Benefit from Pre-deployment Screening and Coordination of Care in Theater

PENTAGON—A newly published study shows that psychiatric and behavioral health disorders were reduced by 78% in Army brigades that underwent a pre-deployment health screening program that focused on screening and then linking soldiers to care in theater, if needed. The… Read More

Recent Women’s Health Studies

A Randomized Controlled Trial on Women’s Substance Abuse Treatment (WPR) Purpose: To examine the efficacy of an evidence-based gender-specific treatment model for women veterans with substance use disorder (SUD). Sponsor: Department of Veterans Affairs ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT00734903 Olaparib in Combination… Read More

Recent Immunology Studies

Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment Objective: To find out if the chance of developing a serious illness or of getting AIDS is less if patients start taking HIV medicines at a time when their CD4-positive cell count is still fairly… Read More

Few Answers, Much Potential in Alzheimer’s Research

WASHINGTON, DC—“A cure for Alzheimer’s (AD) has not been found on my watch, but the momentum is there,” said Marcelle Morrison-Bogorad, PhD, at what might be her last opportunity to speak before Congress as the director of the National Institute… Read More

Research Needed on Stress in Combat Medics

BETHESDA, MD—Where do you find resiliency as a healer and a soldier? As the role of combat medics becomes more and more important to the increasing survival rate of combat casualties, that is a question that military psychiatrists are asking.… Read More

Mild Brain Trauma Could Have Links to Alzheimer’s

BETHESDA, MD—It was two years ago that Ira Katz, MD, PhD, then chief of VA’s mental health services, told researchers at the VISN 20 Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC) in Portland, OR, that they should begin focusing… Read More

Military Challenged to Provide Far-Forward Mental Health Care

BETHESDA, MD—For a handful of military mental health providers on the front lines, treating combat stress and trauma is an everyday occurrence. The military has begun to realize that the advice and care they furnish can often prevent acute battlefield… Read More

Researchers Identifying Gender Differences in Combat Trauma

BETHESDA, MD—Women comprise nearly 20-percent of the military. Many women, like their male counterparts, return from combat traumatized by the events they experienced. Researchers and healthcare providers are beginning to recognize that gender plays a large role in how veterans… Read More