HHS and USPHS

Providing Quality Care To Underserved Families and Communities

Mary K. Wakefield, PhD, Rn, HRSA Administrator The Health Resources and Services Administration, an HHS agency, has major responsibility for supporting the quality and accessibility of the healthcare safety net. In many communities – particularly in rural America, and… Read More

IOM Says Get Rid of 510k approval FDA Responds Not So Fast

WASHINGTON — Six months after the Institute of Medicine (IoM) issued a report recommending the dissolution of FDA’s 510(k) medical device approval process, the agency has yet to release their official response — a delay that has legislators concerned. Unofficially,… Read More

Mild TBI Remains Little Understood and Hard to Diagnose

BETHESDA, MD — With all of the attention given traumatic brain injury in recent years, it can be easy to forget that this is still a nascent area of medical science. It took six years of fighting in Afghanistan and… Read More

Low Risk Prostate Cancer Often Is Over Treated

BETHESDA, MD — Many men are receiving curative therapy for prostate cancer who would be better served by more passive, observational treatment, according to a panel of experts convened by the NIH. After examining the available research — much of… Read More

Tackling Combat Trauma Head On Helps Resolve Sleep Disorders

BETHESDA, MD —A problem with insomnia, one of the shared symptoms of TBI and PTSD, sometimes can be overshadowed by what seem to be more serious, immediate symptoms. For those suffering from sleep disorders, however, exhaustion can quickly take over… Read More

Heart Study Looks At African-American Parents Children

NIH researchers are enrolling multiple generations of patients in a landmark study designed to identify the early warning signs of heart disease among African-Americans. The new feasibility study will enroll children and grandchildren of African-American adults participating in the ongoing… Read More

Military Resumes Adenovirus Vaccinations After More than a Decade Lapse

WASHINGTON — After more than a decade with military recruits vulnerable to adenovirus (ADV), DoD has begun inoculating personnel with a new vaccine to prevent the sometimes severe respiratory infection. Adenovirus Vaccine.jpg: Army recruit receives the adenovirus vaccine during basic… Read More

Is Cognitive Therapy Effective for TBI- Evidence Still Inconclusive

WASHINGTON — While there is evidence that cognitive rehabilitation therapy (CRT) has a positive impact on TBI, it is not sufficient to develop guidelines on how to apply this type of therapy to specific patients, according to a recent report… Read More

Researchers Building a Better Weight-Loss Simulator

A model created by NIH researchers challenges some commonly held diet beliefs, including that eating 3,500 fewer calories, or burning them through exercise, always results in a pound of weight loss. The mathematical model takes into consideration patient weight, diet… Read More

Do HHS Proposed Changes to Common Rule Go Far Enough, Critics Ask

BETHESDA, MD — This summer, HHS announced a proposal to improve the rules governing the protection of human research subjects — a system usually referred to as the Common Rule, which has been in place since 1991. While the proposed… Read More

Best-Practice Programs Reduce Diabetes Rate Among Native Americans, Alaskans

Following encouraging results from a demonstration project that involved 36 Indian Health Service (IHS), tribal and urban Indian health programs, the IHS has added “Youth and Type 2 Diabetes Prevention and Treatment” to its list of best practices. That program… Read More

Powerful New Scanner Improves Diagnosis, Treatment of TBI, PTSD

WASHINGTON — A cutting-edge scanner that combines a whole-body, simultaneous positron emission topography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be invaluable in helping them better understand what changes are occurring in the brains of those suffering from TBI and… Read More

First Malaria Vaccine Could Be Available in Four Years

WASHINGTON — The world’s first malaria vaccine may finally be within reach. Scientists and public health officials are optimistic about recent news that a malaria vaccine candidate was able to reduce the risk of malaria by half in young African… Read More

FDA Is More Bark than Bite on Foreign Drug Imports, Seeks More Authority

WASHINGTON — FDA needs the authority to keep foreign manufacturers who do not comply with regulatory requests from importing their products into the United States, agency officials are telling legislators. Currently, the agency can stop products from entering the country… Read More