Clinical Topics   /   Oncology

CDC: More People Are Getting Screened for Colorectal Cancer

By U.S. Medicine

WASHINGTON, DC—As a result of increased colorectal screening the rate of adults developing and dying from colorectal cancer has decreased, according to a new CDC report.

The rate of new cases of colorectal cancer fell from 52.3 per 100,000 in 2003 to 45.4 per 100,000 in 2007. The colorectal cancer death rate fell from 19.0 per 100,000 in 2003 to 16.7 per 100,000 in 2007. While the report found that colorectal cancer screening increased overall from 52% in 2002 to 65% in 2010, about 1 in 3 people between the ages of 50 and 75 are not up to date with recommended colorectal cancer screening.

“The proportion of Americans who are getting screened for colon cancer has increased very dramatically in recent years, but we’re concerned it may be beginning to level off,” said CDC Director Thomas Frieden, MD. “So we do need to continue to improve the proportion of people, or increase the proportion of people who are tested for colon cancer.”

Frieden said that the largest single risk factor for not being screened for colon cancer “is someone’s doctor not recommending that they be screened.”

“So doctors have a lot to do, and individuals have a lot to do to make sure that they follow up on appointments and identify what services are available to them,” he said.

 


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