VA Reports Increase in Suicides Among Young Male Veterans

by U.S. Medicine

January 14, 2014

WASHINGTON — The suicide rate among male veterans under 30 has increased, according to a recent VA suicide data update.

According to a VHA briefing, the rate of suicides among male veteran VHA users aged 18 to 24 jumped from 46.1 per 100,000 in 2009 to 79.1 per 100,000 in 2011.  Overall, the rate of suicides among 18 to 29 year old males increased from 40.3 per 100,000 users in 2009 to 57.9 per 100,000 VHA users in 2011.

The statistics were provided as part of a VHA briefing that detailed additional information related to a 2012 VA suicide report.

“Data has been obtained from the CDC and several states; this now allows us to look at veteran suicide rates in comparison with the general population and compare veterans who get care in the VHA with those who do not,” the briefing explained.

Other findings reported by VHA include:

  • The rate of suicide among female VHA users remains higher than the rate of suicides among all U.S. females.
  • Rates of suicide among VHA users with mental health conditions have decreased
  • The greatest percentage of suicides among male VHA users result from a firearm injury

That suicide rates among the total population of VHA users remained more or less constant over the past several years, according to VHA.

The data can be found at: http://www.blogs.va.gov/VAntage/11973/january-2014-va-suicide-data-update/


Related Articles

New Agents Extend Options for Increased Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Accounting for nearly a third of all cancer diagnoses, prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in the VHA, where past research has suggested that the malignancy is caught earlier than in other healthcare systems.

Undertreatment of Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Treatment, Despite Guidelines

While many other cancers have seen dramatic improvement in outcomes in the past 20 years, pancreatic cancer remains one of the deadliest malignancies, regardless of stage at diagnosis, with an overall five-year survival rate of only 8%, according to the American Cancer Society.


U.S. Medicine Recommends


More From late breaking news

Late Breaking News

New Agents Extend Options for Increased Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Accounting for nearly a third of all cancer diagnoses, prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in the VHA, where past research has suggested that the malignancy is caught earlier than in other healthcare systems.

Late Breaking News

Undertreatment of Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Treatment, Despite Guidelines

While many other cancers have seen dramatic improvement in outcomes in the past 20 years, pancreatic cancer remains one of the deadliest malignancies, regardless of stage at diagnosis, with an overall five-year survival rate of only 8%, according to the American Cancer Society.

Late Breaking News

EMR Alert Helps Reduce Opioid/Benzodiazepine Co-Prescribing Risk at VAMCs

Since the launch of the Opioid Safety Initiative in 2012, the VA has implemented a number of steps designed to reduce the use of opioids and the risk of addiction and overdose among veterans.

Late Breaking News

New Therapy Options Recently Approved for Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

While the availability of novel therapies is making the future brighter for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) patients, new treatments also are coming on line for Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which is a hematological cancer distinct from NHL.

Late Breaking News

Despite Overall Longevity Trends, Mortality Increases for Schizophrenia Patients

Since the 1970s, mortality rates have declined, extending average lifespan by almost a decade.

Facebook Comment

Subscribe to U.S. Medicine Print Magazine

U.S. Medicine is mailed free each month to physicians, pharmacists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and administrators working for Veterans Affairs, Department of Defense and U.S. Public Health Service.

Subscribe Now

Receive Our Email Newsletter

Stay informed about federal medical news, clinical updates and reports on government topics for the federal healthcare professional.

Sign Up