Embrace the suck

As I write this editorial, I am fully engaged in the Uniformed Services University’s Operation Bushmaster1 as a platoon team leader instructor. I have mentioned this activity numerous times on this editorial forum. The Bushmaster experience is perhaps the best example of why USU is clearly a unique medical university producing medical leaders for our military and our country. For the USU School of Medicine, Bushmaster is the culminating final exam where students exercise four years of military-specific training in leadership and battlefield trauma management provided through the USU Department of Military and Emergency Medicine, where I currently serve as a professor of anesthesiology.

I told you so

I told you so

“The four most beautiful words in our common language: I told you so.”—Gore Vidal (1925-2012)
I wrote an editorial in U.S. Medicine on June 10, 2018, entitled “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.”

In an Age of Incompetence

In an Age of Incompetence

“I am, as I’ve said, merely competent. But in an age of incompetence, that makes me extraordinary.” ~Billy Joel

Like many others who pursue a career in medicine, I invested my early years as a 20-something in a seemingly endless effort to obtain the necessary education and training requirements to place an MD at the end of my name. Yes, I would find part-time work in the summer for extra beer money but did not need to work while in school. I was fortunate to have parents willing to financially support my educational efforts and “Uncle Sugar” (the U.S. Government) was willing to pay for my collegiate and medical school expenses in exchange for Army services in defense of the Constitution.

Do as much nothing as possible

Do as much nothing as possible

“13. The delivery of good medical care is to do as much nothing as possible.” “Laws of the House of God,” ~Samuel Shem

I have been a part of U.S. Medicine and this column for several years now. I am occasionally asked where my ideas come from for the editorials I produce. Many ideas, of course, are pulled right out of the headlines or the nightly news. Others are derived from my experiences, both medical and otherwise, that have a link (no matter how tenuous) to our collective experience as federal medicine providers.

“God help us, if, the first time something fails—and something will fail—we crush whoever it was … whoever’s responsible,” —Gen. John “Mike” Murray

Gen. Mike Murray made this comment as he became the first commander of the Army Futures Command. The command’s website describes the mission of the organization with the following statement: “Army Futures Command leads a continuous transformation of Army modernization...

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