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August 2014 Focus

by U.S. Medicine

September 16, 2014

In this Issue:

Focus on Infectious Diseases

HIV/HCV Co-Infected Patients Have No Safe Level of Alcohol Use

VA’s Resistant Infection ‘Bundle’ Drives Down MRSA in Community Living Centers

Pharmacy Update

Milwaukee VA Develops Reversal Protocol for Novel Oral Anticoagulants

Diabetes Clinical Consult

Surgery Means Better Glucose Control for Veterans

Neurology Clinical Consult

Pesticides Plus Gene Variant Increase Parkinson’s Risk

U.S. MEDICINE NEWS UPDATE

TBI Increases Dementia Risks for Older Veterans
MINNEAPOLIS – Experiencing a traumatic brain injury (TBI) ups the risk 60% for older veterans to later develop dementia, according to a recent study. The report also found that, among all veterans developing dementia, veterans with a history of TBI developed cognitive issues about two years earlier than those without that type of head injury. More
http://www.usmedicine.com/agencies/department-of-defense-dod/tbi-increases-dementia-risks-for-older-veterans/

FOCUS ON INFECTIOUS DISEASES

Amy Justice, MD, PhD
HIV/HCV Co-Infected Patients Have No Safe Level of Alcohol Use
PHILADELPHIA – Otherwise “non-hazardous” levels of drinking pose a real danger for patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus. Drinking, even moderately, dramatically increases the risk of liver fibrosis, according to a new study. Between 20% and 30% of HIV patients also have HCV. More
http://www.usmedicine.com/current-issue/hivhcv-co-infected-patients-have-no-safe-level-of-alcohol-use/

Martin E. Evans, MD
VA’s Resistant Infection ‘Bundle’ Drives Down MRSA in Community Living Centers
LEXINGTON, KY – A bundle of preventive measures that drove down the number of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections acquired in acute care hospitals and spinal injury units in the VA healthcare system has proven effective in reducing MRSA rates in long-term care facilities, as well. The VA rolled out the MRSA Prevention Initiative to CLCs in January 2009. More
http://www.usmedicine.com/2014-issues/august-2014/vas-resistant-infection-bundle-drives-down-mrsa-in-community-living-centers/
PHARMACY UPDATE

Daisy Peterson, PharmD
Milwaukee VA Develops Reversal Protocol for Novel Oral Anticoagulants
MILWAUKEE – Clement J. Zablocki Veterans Administration Medical Center in Milwaukee used the novel or target specific oral anticogaulants – dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban and apixaban – since they were first approved, starting in 2009 with dabigatran. The advantages were clear, but the lack of a specific antidote was troubling, not only for patients, but also for the pharmacists and physicians involved in the anticoagulation clinics. In 2012, a group at the VAMC convened a group to develop a protocol for treating a bleeding event in a patient on dabigatran or rivaroxaban. More
http://www.usmedicine.com/agencies/department-of-veterans-affairs/milwaukee-va-develops-reversal-protocol-for-novel-oral-anticoagulants/
DIABETES CLINICAL CONSULT

Surgery Means Better Glucose Control for Veterans
BRONX, NY – Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy produced better blood glucose control for veterans after two years than standard diabetes medical care without weight loss surgery, according to a new study.The research, presented recently at the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society: ICE/ENDO 2014 in Chicago, also found that 76% of surgery patients were able to reduce their use of diabetes medications, compared with only 26% of patients in the non-surgical group. More
http://www.usmedicine.com/clinical-topics/diabetes/surgery-means-better-glucose-control-for-veterans/

NEUROLOGY CLINICAL CONSULT

Pesticides Plus Gene Variant Increase Parkinson’s Risk
LOS ANGELES – Exposure to pesticides may increase the risk of Parkinson’s disease, and certain gene variants may make some people even more susceptible to the disease, according to a new study. The research indicated that specific pesticides inhibiting aldehyde dehydrogenase are linked to an increased risk of Parkinson’s disease. In addition, people with a variant of the gene were two to five times more likely to develop Parkinson’s disease with exposure to these pesticides than people who did not have that gene variant, the report pointed out. More
http://www.usmedicine.com/agencies/department-of-defense-dod/pesticides-plus-gene-variant-increase-parkinsons-risk/

Brenda L. Mooney
Editorial Director, U.S. Medicine
[email protected]
39 York Street
Lambertville, NJ  08530



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