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Canakinumab Is Option for Patients Intolerant of Other Therapy

by U.S. Medicine

December 8, 2014

SAN DIEGO – Treating gouty arthritis is problematic in patients who have contraindications for, or are unresponsive or intolerant of, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or colchicine. A new study has found, however, that canakinumab (CAN), a selective, fully human, anti-IL-1β monoclonal antibody, may be an alternative.

Researchers from the San Diego VAMC and the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of California San Diego in, La Jolla pooled data from two trials — β-RELIEVED and β-RELIEVED II, involving a total of about 500 patients — for a retrospective analysis. The trials collected different responses, including patient-reported outcomes (PRO, according to the report published recently in the International Journal of Clinical Practice.1

Results indicated that, on average, patients receiving CAN met a higher percentage of response criteria (65%) than patients receiving triamcinolone acetonide (TA) (49%) The drug also appeared to produce long term benefits.

“CAN was superior to TA across multiple health-outcome variables comprising clinical markers and PRO over 12 weeks in patients contraindicated, intolerant or unresponsive to NSAIDs and/or colchicine,” the authors wrote.

1 Hirsch JD, Gnanasakthy A, Lale R, Choi K, Sarkin AJ. Efficacy of Canakinumab vs. triamcinolone acetonide according to multiple gouty arthritis-related health outcomes measures. Int J Clin Pract. 2014 Oct 9. doi: 10.1111/ijcp.12521. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 25298264.

 


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